Wednesday, July 1, 2020

Linsanity and Harvard Admissions

Linsanity and Harvard Admissions March 16, 2012 Linsanity will have an impact on Harvard admissions statistics. The data supports this projection (photo credit: David Shankbone). Do you think Harvard admissions statistics will be impacted this spring by Linsanity? Do you think the universitys yield will be through the roof? Do you think more applicants will apply to Harvard next year than ever before? And, if so, do you think star New York Knicks point guard Jeremy Lin has anything to do with it? At Ivy Coach, we do! Remember Doug Flutie? He had a solid NFL career as well as a great CFL career. But before he played pro football, he was the QB at Boston College. You might recall (or maybe youve seen replays) of his Hail Mary pass that beat Jimmy Johnsons Miami Hurricanes. According to The Washington Post article on Linsanity and Harvard Admission, Boston College gave birth to the Flutie Effect in the 1980s, when applications for the freshman class jumped 30 percent in the two years after Doug Flutie threw a Hail Mary to beat Miami, the defending national champion, and win the 1984 Heisman Trophy. The theory: A school’s athletic success could create positive publicity that lifts the academic side as well. We know applications to Duke rise as they advance further in the NCAA Tournament (guess applications wont increase next yearsorry Duke). And remember Jim Larranagas George Mason squad? We wrote extensively about the impact Masons Final Four run had on its admissions statistics. The average SAT score of applicants went up by 25 points. And so many more students ended up applying to the Virginia school. Drew Faust, the Harvard president, believes like us that Harvards admissions statistics will reflect Linsanity. And the research by Jaren and Devin Pope, research weve referred to quite a bit over the years, supports Fausts claim. Big basketball or football runs matter. A Harvard graduate competing on the biggest stage in basketball that has to count for something. And for those of you who think Jeremy Lin is going away now that Mike Woodson is at the helm of the Knicks, think again. Jeremy Lin may be taking fewer shots, but hes playing as good as ever. Linsanity is for keeps. If anyones going to have to adjust, its Melo.

Friday, June 26, 2020

How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction - 2750 Words

How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction (Essay Sample) Content: How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction.NameProfessorInstitutionCourseDateIntroductionFranchise business system is a very attractive business for both the small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The format of this business requires relation between franchisees and franchisors, as well informed entrepreneurs taking up the problems of self-employment. In other countries for instance Thailand, the franchise business was initiated in the year 1983, and it is the key contributor of potential economy and income. In the economic environment, both franchisee and franchisors can provide different benefits to their business. There are some sectors that have been highly competitive in the franchise business, for instance, food industry.However, firms rely heavily on expansion by a mix of franchising, and company-owned outlets instead of expanding company owned outlets. Explanations are offered by most of the literature in the agency theory. Due to the significance of s elf-interest for both franchisees and franchisors, franchising is the only best mechanism that motivates both parties for the similar objectives (Huang, 2004). However, there might be unfairness in the franchise contract, and this means agency problems would arise. Therefore, franchisors need to manage and monitor franchisees and ensure the franchisee is satisfied. Thus, the franchisee satisfaction has the greatest predictor on whether a franchisee would recommend their franchisor to the prospective franchisee (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013). The paper explains how franchisors can enhance franchisee satisfaction.Franchisor ownership Patterns and Agency TheoryIn franchising, the patterns ownership can vary from company to another company as well as industry to industry. Firms can open company-owned stores, and then franchising some newly established locations later. However, this is best for firms willing to grow steadily and gradually. The best part of this approach is that the franc hisor can test the products mix or even the business in the company-owned so that it can prevent potential conflict with franchisees after that (Huang, 2004).In addition, a firm can establish both company-owned outlets and franchise simultaneously. This approach provides a way of combining the advantages of any other option available. Convenience store can be the plural system; the franchisor supervises operations in a company owned outlets before being franchised, and then franchised profitable company-owned outlets or new locations to franchisees. Because of the combined ownership of the store equipment and outlets, the relationship between the franchisees and franchisors is linked. However, in contrast with estate agency that is a purely franchised system whereby franchisees own the store outlets, and the ownership is purely independent of the franchisor (Huang, 2004).In the agency theory, the widely and most accepted explanation is based on Robinà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s argument of the year 1978. However, according to this theory, company-owned unitsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ managers can neither bear the full costs nor receive the benefits in full of their efforts due to the weak link between their compensation and performance of their outlets. They might shirk the responsibility of the work. However, the agency theory is relating the perception that franchising is an effective solution to the challenges of low levels of productivity and employee motivation, and there is no cost incurred for supervising and monitoring employees. However, it is due to franchisees bearing more of the costs of their shirking because franchisees are compensated from their residual claims of individual units (Huang, 2004).Another plausible explanation for franchising is agency consideration of franchising that stresses organizational efficiency. Based on the works of Jensen and Meckling (1976) provided the underpinning theoretical for any agency franchising perspective, particularly in relation to the c ost to monitor unit managers of a company-owned. Under an agency theory perspective, company-owned unit managers would be susceptible to excessive perk consumption and shirking behaviour because it is costly to monitor and control managersà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ behaviour. However, shirking and perk consumption should be minimized under franchising arrangements because the franchisee, a residual owner, would suffer the negative consequences of inefficiencies and shirking. In other words, franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ status of an owner-manager is a somehow substitution that is direct to monitor the manager of the owned company. These arguments suggest that franchising is an efficient form of organization when agency costs associated with selecting, motivating, assimilating, and monitoring hired labour are high. As such, franchising is an alternative way for firms to select the most entrepreneurial managers to minimize these adjustment costs.A critical aspect of a franchising agreement is the franchise eà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s right to use the franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s established national brand name in exchange for a share of the profits through royalties on revenue or output. Stated differently, franchising is akin to leasing intangible assets (i.e. a brand name) (Brickley and Dark, 1987). Franchisees enter into franchise system for a variety of reasons. Among those, a franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s proven business format and easy start-up allow franchisees to minimize the risks of operation if they are unfamiliar with the business (Lundberg, 1994). When a franchisor possesses a robust brand name, franchisees feel that there is greater potential for their operation to be a success. Franchisees rely on a franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s established business format, which enhances the likelihood of the survival and eventual success of the franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s business.The relationship between franchisee and franchisor is unique in its nature because they have to work together long before the franchisee is enga ged in actual franchise establishments. As a prelude, the franchisor reviews the proposed plans and specifications for a franchised unit and grants or withholds the franchise agreement. Once the plan is approved, the franchisor provides an opening team of trainers to assist in a smooth transition for the franchisee, followed by ongoing services (Dugan, 1998).There is considerable theoretical support for the notion that the franchisor is interested in the franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction. When the franchisees are satisfied with the franchisor, they are more cooperative and more likely to contribute to the success of the overall franchise system. The franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction may reduce the franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s agency cost by promoting collaboration between two parties (Jambulingam and Nevin, 1999). In the hotel industry, Brown and Dev (1997) argued that franchisors with a strong partnership with their franchisees outperformed competing hotels and other hotels in the ch ain in terms of occupancy rates, room rates, and gross profit.The relationship between franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction and their retention rate is of particular interest to the franchising industry because franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ satisfaction can be used as a leading indicator of franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ commitment to the organization. Intuitively, the likelihood of remaining in the existing franchise system is high for satisfied franchisees. Morrison (1997) found that performance, organizational commitment, congeniality of franchisor relations and intention to remain had significant positive correlations with satisfaction. In short, franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ satisfaction is a key variable for their intention to remain and thus it leads to the survival in long-term of the network franchise (Gauzente, 2003).Franchisorsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ Performance Perceived by Franchisee SatisfactionOrganizations have applied the performance measurement in order to implement the system in the management coop eration between parties. It always includes problems that are related to satisfaction of stakeholder and customer. In addition, Franchisor Performance refers to the satisfaction of the franchisee with the services provided by its franchisor. In addition, franchisee satisfaction is to the extent that a franchisee is satisfied with the franchisor as it affects her or his function in the franchise organization (PekkolaUkko, 2011). However, the satisfaction with the franchisor would affect franchise performance positively. Moreover, the implications of the managerial on franchise system indicate the efficiency customer and operation satisfaction as the indicating factor of franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s performance (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013).The franchisee distribution of response for the items satisfaction that are associated with operating and purchasing an outlet of franchised, the franchisee satisfaction measurement needed the appraisal of given benefits and costs and on-going as well a s initial franchisee support services that are provided by the franchisors. However, being satisfied as the franchise relationship behaviour, satisfaction franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ is most contingent upon the expectations of franchisee. Therefore, franchisors need to focus on a specific dimensions which contribute to dissatisfaction of the franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ and emphasizing specified dimension of carrying forward the service to improve relationship of both the parties to fulfil the responsibilities and contractual duties. In addition, franchisors should design a proper system of distributing goods and services that would assist the franchisees in marketing their products. However, this would result to improvement in satisfaction of franchisees with respect to services that are provided by the franchisor (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013).Relationship Marketing and Franchisorsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ PerformanceR... How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction - 2750 Words How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction (Essay Sample) Content: How a Franchisor can Enhance Franchisee Satisfaction.NameProfessorInstitutionCourseDateIntroductionFranchise business system is a very attractive business for both the small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The format of this business requires relation between franchisees and franchisors, as well informed entrepreneurs taking up the problems of self-employment. In other countries for instance Thailand, the franchise business was initiated in the year 1983, and it is the key contributor of potential economy and income. In the economic environment, both franchisee and franchisors can provide different benefits to their business. There are some sectors that have been highly competitive in the franchise business, for instance, food industry.However, firms rely heavily on expansion by a mix of franchising, and company-owned outlets instead of expanding company owned outlets. Explanations are offered by most of the literature in the agency theory. Due to the significance of s elf-interest for both franchisees and franchisors, franchising is the only best mechanism that motivates both parties for the similar objectives (Huang, 2004). However, there might be unfairness in the franchise contract, and this means agency problems would arise. Therefore, franchisors need to manage and monitor franchisees and ensure the franchisee is satisfied. Thus, the franchisee satisfaction has the greatest predictor on whether a franchisee would recommend their franchisor to the prospective franchisee (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013). The paper explains how franchisors can enhance franchisee satisfaction.Franchisor ownership Patterns and Agency TheoryIn franchising, the patterns ownership can vary from company to another company as well as industry to industry. Firms can open company-owned stores, and then franchising some newly established locations later. However, this is best for firms willing to grow steadily and gradually. The best part of this approach is that the franc hisor can test the products mix or even the business in the company-owned so that it can prevent potential conflict with franchisees after that (Huang, 2004).In addition, a firm can establish both company-owned outlets and franchise simultaneously. This approach provides a way of combining the advantages of any other option available. Convenience store can be the plural system; the franchisor supervises operations in a company owned outlets before being franchised, and then franchised profitable company-owned outlets or new locations to franchisees. Because of the combined ownership of the store equipment and outlets, the relationship between the franchisees and franchisors is linked. However, in contrast with estate agency that is a purely franchised system whereby franchisees own the store outlets, and the ownership is purely independent of the franchisor (Huang, 2004).In the agency theory, the widely and most accepted explanation is based on Robinà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s argument of the year 1978. However, according to this theory, company-owned unitsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ managers can neither bear the full costs nor receive the benefits in full of their efforts due to the weak link between their compensation and performance of their outlets. They might shirk the responsibility of the work. However, the agency theory is relating the perception that franchising is an effective solution to the challenges of low levels of productivity and employee motivation, and there is no cost incurred for supervising and monitoring employees. However, it is due to franchisees bearing more of the costs of their shirking because franchisees are compensated from their residual claims of individual units (Huang, 2004).Another plausible explanation for franchising is agency consideration of franchising that stresses organizational efficiency. Based on the works of Jensen and Meckling (1976) provided the underpinning theoretical for any agency franchising perspective, particularly in relation to the c ost to monitor unit managers of a company-owned. Under an agency theory perspective, company-owned unit managers would be susceptible to excessive perk consumption and shirking behaviour because it is costly to monitor and control managersà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ behaviour. However, shirking and perk consumption should be minimized under franchising arrangements because the franchisee, a residual owner, would suffer the negative consequences of inefficiencies and shirking. In other words, franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ status of an owner-manager is a somehow substitution that is direct to monitor the manager of the owned company. These arguments suggest that franchising is an efficient form of organization when agency costs associated with selecting, motivating, assimilating, and monitoring hired labour are high. As such, franchising is an alternative way for firms to select the most entrepreneurial managers to minimize these adjustment costs.A critical aspect of a franchising agreement is the franchise eà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s right to use the franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s established national brand name in exchange for a share of the profits through royalties on revenue or output. Stated differently, franchising is akin to leasing intangible assets (i.e. a brand name) (Brickley and Dark, 1987). Franchisees enter into franchise system for a variety of reasons. Among those, a franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s proven business format and easy start-up allow franchisees to minimize the risks of operation if they are unfamiliar with the business (Lundberg, 1994). When a franchisor possesses a robust brand name, franchisees feel that there is greater potential for their operation to be a success. Franchisees rely on a franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s established business format, which enhances the likelihood of the survival and eventual success of the franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s business.The relationship between franchisee and franchisor is unique in its nature because they have to work together long before the franchisee is enga ged in actual franchise establishments. As a prelude, the franchisor reviews the proposed plans and specifications for a franchised unit and grants or withholds the franchise agreement. Once the plan is approved, the franchisor provides an opening team of trainers to assist in a smooth transition for the franchisee, followed by ongoing services (Dugan, 1998).There is considerable theoretical support for the notion that the franchisor is interested in the franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction. When the franchisees are satisfied with the franchisor, they are more cooperative and more likely to contribute to the success of the overall franchise system. The franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction may reduce the franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s agency cost by promoting collaboration between two parties (Jambulingam and Nevin, 1999). In the hotel industry, Brown and Dev (1997) argued that franchisors with a strong partnership with their franchisees outperformed competing hotels and other hotels in the ch ain in terms of occupancy rates, room rates, and gross profit.The relationship between franchiseeà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s satisfaction and their retention rate is of particular interest to the franchising industry because franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ satisfaction can be used as a leading indicator of franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ commitment to the organization. Intuitively, the likelihood of remaining in the existing franchise system is high for satisfied franchisees. Morrison (1997) found that performance, organizational commitment, congeniality of franchisor relations and intention to remain had significant positive correlations with satisfaction. In short, franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ satisfaction is a key variable for their intention to remain and thus it leads to the survival in long-term of the network franchise (Gauzente, 2003).Franchisorsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ Performance Perceived by Franchisee SatisfactionOrganizations have applied the performance measurement in order to implement the system in the management coop eration between parties. It always includes problems that are related to satisfaction of stakeholder and customer. In addition, Franchisor Performance refers to the satisfaction of the franchisee with the services provided by its franchisor. In addition, franchisee satisfaction is to the extent that a franchisee is satisfied with the franchisor as it affects her or his function in the franchise organization (PekkolaUkko, 2011). However, the satisfaction with the franchisor would affect franchise performance positively. Moreover, the implications of the managerial on franchise system indicate the efficiency customer and operation satisfaction as the indicating factor of franchisorà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬s performance (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013).The franchisee distribution of response for the items satisfaction that are associated with operating and purchasing an outlet of franchised, the franchisee satisfaction measurement needed the appraisal of given benefits and costs and on-going as well a s initial franchisee support services that are provided by the franchisors. However, being satisfied as the franchise relationship behaviour, satisfaction franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ is most contingent upon the expectations of franchisee. Therefore, franchisors need to focus on a specific dimensions which contribute to dissatisfaction of the franchiseesà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ and emphasizing specified dimension of carrying forward the service to improve relationship of both the parties to fulfil the responsibilities and contractual duties. In addition, franchisors should design a proper system of distributing goods and services that would assist the franchisees in marketing their products. However, this would result to improvement in satisfaction of franchisees with respect to services that are provided by the franchisor (Hnuchek, Ismail Haron, 2013).Relationship Marketing and Franchisorsà ¢Ã¢â€š ¬ PerformanceR...

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Essay about the Stranger and the Absurd - 1296 Words

The Stranger is heavily rooted in philosopher Albert Camus’ theory of the absurd: the notion that human life has no definable purpose, and while the pursuit of an intrinsic meaning to life and the universe holds value, it will inevitably prove futile. Meursault, Camus’ protagonist, lives his life according to these tenets, however unwittingly, and for the majority of the novel reacts only to concrete, sensory things, showing neither understanding nor interest in more abstract societal constructs. Grief, guilt, passion and morality are foreign concepts to Meursault, but it is only through the prospect of impending death that he realizes that he lives in a separate world from the rest of society, where his perceptions and beliefs about the†¦show more content†¦This is only the first in a long line of reactions to emotional stimuli by Meursault. Friendships, proposals, sentences and hatred are not reacted to icily or harshly; they’re just not reacted to at all. This follows Meursault’s tendency throughout the majority of the novel to focus on the physical, tangible world rather than the nonphysical, intangible one. In Meursault’s mind, and in the mind of absurdist philosophers, the only real things in the universe are those that we can experience in the physical sense. When asked by the perverted and violent Raymond to write a letter to his mistress to manipulate her back into his arms so that he could abuse her yet again, Meursault acquiesces, showing his very distinct lack of a stringent moral compass by saying that â€Å"I tried my best to please Raymond because I didn’t have any reason not to please him† (pg 32). He doesn’t mind helping Raymond or becoming his â€Å"pal,† because while it may seem repugnant to the reader to befriend someone like Raymond, Meursault is incapable of making value judgments like these, and couldn’t care more or less either way. Meursault’s dependence of the physical senses for decision-making and perception is a main reason why he, a heretofore nonviolent, passive man, shoots the Arab at the climax of Part 1. Meursault kills the Arab because of his response to the glaring sun, in a scene that is as disorienting to the reader as itShow MoreRelatedEssay on The Absurd in Albert Camus’ The Stranger1036 Words   |  5 PagesEmpathy makes us human yet not all humans are emphatic, In Albert Camus’ The Stranger a suspiciously apathetic man named Meursault comes to light as a criminal. However Meursault perpetrated a crime of passion, is that not absurd for a negligent man? In a simple view of Meursault life and philosophies the remission of human feelings is evident, and slightly frightening. In the stranger most of the events in the main characters life require an emotional effect, the death of his mother, the engagementRead MoreThe Paper of the Absurd: a Literary Analysis of the Stranger1772 Words   |  8 PagesThe Paper of the Absurd: A Literary Analysis of The Stranger By: Michael Lovett Advanced Placement English Language and Compositions 5th Period 13th of December, 2010 Michael Lovett In Albert Camus’ existential novel The Stranger, the pointlessness of life and existence is exposed and expounded upon in such a manner that the entire foundation of spirituality is shaken. The concept that drives this novel is one coined by Albert Camus himself, the â€Å"absurd†. Under the absurd, life is pointlessRead MoreAbsurd Actions of Meursault in The Stranger by Albert Camus538 Words   |  2 PagesIn â€Å"The Stranger† by Camus, Meursault’s actions throughout the story can be summed up in one word, absurd. From the start of the story Meursault showed no regard to human life. Life to him was meaningless. His action toward his mother’s death was the 1st encounter into how emotionless, cold, untouched unmoved Meursault was. Although he attended her funeral he was only there in the physical. Natures’ element and the environment around him was more of concern to him than the death of his motherRead More A Comparison of the Heroes Of The Stranger (The Outsider) and The Myth of Sisyphus1076 Words   |  5 Pages The Absurd Heroes Of The Stranger (The Outsider) and The Myth of Sisyphusnbsp;nbsp; In The Myth of Sisyphus, Sisyphus is an absurd hero because he realizes his situation, does not appeal, and yet continues the struggle. The purpose of this essay is to demonstrate that The Stranger is, in narrative style, also showing us an absurd hero, or the beginning of an absurd hero in Meursault. In The Myth of Sisyphus Camus establishes the epistemology on which he bases all his works. Ant its a veryRead MoreEssay Theory of the Absurd1667 Words   |  7 PagesAccording to critic Mark Esslin, the concept of â€Å"Theatre of the Absurd† relates to the â€Å"playwrights loosely grouped under the label of the absurd attempt to convey their sense of bewilderment, anxiety, and wonder in the face of an inexplicable universe† (â€Å"The Theatre†). Esslin stressed the fact that plays and stories belonging to the â€Å"Theatre of the Absurd† were composed of situations dealing with the way a human reacts to an event, without any form of importance, thus only stressing over insignificantRead MoreAnalysis Of The Absurd 1184 Words   |  5 PagesThe Absurd It is safe to say the idea of absurdism can be linked to meaningless, and other such words that express a destination without the means to there and vice versa. In Camus’ famous fictional novel, he shows how one’s perception of life can be effected when faced with death. The Stranger reflects Camus’ philosophical stance on absurdism. There is no truth, no certainty, or any unwavering, non-relative laws in life. There is no sense in pursuing impossibilities. But if life is in a sense pointlessRead MoreExistentialism And The Absurd By Albert Camus1186 Words   |  5 Pagesmeaning within their work. In his various books, short stories, and plays, the French-Algerian writer Albert Camus relates to his philosophical beliefs: specifically existentialism and the absurd, as well as his connecting idea of rebellion. Camus’ most prominent works – such as the novels The Plague, The Stranger, The Rebel, and others – reflect these beliefs and ideas he held. Though he was and continues to be considered as one, Camus made a point of rejecting the label of an existentialist. ExistentialismRead More The Absurdity of Man Essay621 Words   |  3 PagesCamus’ â€Å"The Stranger† and â€Å"The Myth of Sisyphus.† Camus depicts absurdity bringing about happiness or indifference in each of these literary works. In â€Å"The Myth of Sisyphus,† it is made clear that Sisyphus is aware that his existence is absurd. He is sentenced to an eternity of rolling a boulder up a steep mountain only to let it roll back down when it reaches its peak. His tragedy lies in the fact that he is conscious of the extent of his own misery. What makes his struggle very absurd is that heRead MoreAlbert Camus and Bohemian Rhapsody Comparison1695 Words   |  7 Pages Combining the writings of â€Å"Queen† and Albert Camus Albert Camus was one of the most renowned authors during the early twentieth century. With writings such as The Stranger, and The Plague, Camus has struck the world of literature with amazing works that are analyzed to a great extent. This amazing success was not just handed to Camus on a silver platter however; Albert endured many hard times and was often encumbered with great illness in his short life. These hardships that Camus had to faceRead MoreThe Pathetic Fallacy in Camus’ the Stranger and Yoshimoto’s Kitchen1624 Words   |  7 PagesThe Pathetic Fallacy in Camus’ The Stranger and Yoshimoto’s Kitchen English A1 – Higher Level World Literature Paper 1 Ojiugo Nneoma UCHE Candidate Number: 1415-068 1480 Words May 2010 In Camus’ The Stranger, and Yoshimoto’s Kitchen, both authors use the literary technique of pathetic fallacy – a branch of personification – which gives to the weather and physical world, human attributes. In both texts, this technique enriches the narratives both aesthetically and in terms of meaning – by telling

Monday, May 18, 2020

The Theory Of Human Life Development Essay - 1572 Words

Throughout chapter one, I’m given a general scope of understanding on how there are multidisciplinary aspects of development that encompass and influence someone’s life, whether it be biological, socioemotional or cognitive. We have many concepts of gauging an individual’s age, including psychological, biological, social and ,most commonly used or expressed, chronological. These concepts together, including social, economic, cultural and chronological similarities and differences, make up our developmental timeline, with everyone’s being unique. Theories of development to make sense of such complexity have been made including Freud’s psychosexual stages, Erikson’s psychosocial stages, ecological theory, ethological theory and one that attempts to incorporate or use them all, the eclectic theory. With many methods of collecting data and time span research we can identify patterns and offer solutions to many problems. However, there will always be the issue with sorting through and eliminating bias research and irrelevant, misguided and misleading information. Human life development is an interesting field to study, with the enormous amount of information to incorporate into theories, problems, hypothesis’s and potential solutions. Where does one begin and with what purpose or pursuit? I have always enjoyed simplified theories such as Erik Erikson’s, that attempt to explain something that we humans have encountered millions of times over, unless you are a young earth believerShow MoreRelatedThe Theory Of Human Life Development Essay1576 Words   |  7 Pagesmultidisciplinary aspects of development that encompass and influence someone’s life, whether it be biological, socioemotional or cognitive. We have many concepts of gauging an individual’s age including psychological, biological, social and most commonly used or expressed, chronological. These concepts together, including social, economic, cultural and chronological similarities and differences, make up our developmental timeline, with everyone’s being unique. Theories on development to make sense of suchRead MoreTheories About Human Developments Through A Life Span1742 Words   |  7 Pageshas taught and explained many theories about human developments through a life span. Such has Erikson’s stage of Identity Vs. Identity confusion which is explained by how aging adolescents face deciding who they are, what they are all about, and where they are going in life. Identity is aided by psychosocial moratorium, its noted that society leaves adolescents free of responsibility, and allows them to try different identities throughout a lifespan. Another theory that Dr. Zeng taught and explainedRead MoreA Psychological Interview Analysis Of Levinson s Life Structure Approach And Erikson s Theory Of Human Development Essay944 Words   |  4 PagesComparison: A Psychological Interview Analysis of Levinson’ s Life Structure Approach and Erikson’s Theory of Human Development Approach This psychological interview analysis will compare and summarize the theoretical applications of Erikson’s Theory of Human Development and Levinson’s Life Structure Approach. The subject of the interview, Charlotte McBeth, will express the challenges that arise in the stable and transitional periods of life in a Scottish family, which she expresses in the various aspectsRead MoreLifespan Perspectives1061 Words   |  5 PagesLifespan perspectives Although humans seem very different from one another, each human develops partly like everyone else, yet partly like no one else. Most of the time human’s attention is focused on one another’s unique qualities instead of realizing how similar humans really are. In fact, as humans, almost everyone has traveled some similar path. People such as, President Barack Obama, Joan of Arc, and Marilyn Monroe shared similar paths of life span development. Each one began to walk at approximatelyRead MoreEssay about Human Growth and Development1057 Words   |  5 PagesHuman Growth and Development Peter Nyarkoh PSY/280 July 17, 2010 Khurshid Khan Human Growth and Development Human growth and the life span perspective begin from the day of conception and continue throughout the life span. It is a lifelong process which involves periods and domains of very great importance. Psychologist, sociologist, and others have done many researches into the life span of humans and have made various conclusions as to how humans behave at any given time in the life spanRead MoreAdolescence Is A Critical Time For A Human1405 Words   |  6 Pages Identity development is a fluid process throughout the human life cycle. Seemingly, adolescence, development after the age of 12 through young adulthood, is the most difficult transitive period in the life cycle. Adolescence is a critical time for a human, because it is the period when various personal roles are examined and one tries to assimilate these roles into a perception of self. Adolescents are struggling to identify different areas in their life such as religious preferences, sexualityRead MoreThe Theory Of Huma n Development1060 Words   |  5 PagesTheories of human development deliver a framework to deliberate human growth, development, and learning. Understanding the theories can deliver useful contents into individuals and society a set of principles and concepts that describe life span development. Development perspectives are the psychoanalytic theory, behavior theory, humanistic approach and cognitive theory. Each theory focuses on different aspects of human development. The psychoanalytic is â€Å"the approach stating that behavior is motivatedRead MorePsychoanalytic Theories Explain Development As Unconscious Processes That Are Heavily Colored By Emotion846 Words   |  4 Pages Psychoanalytic theories explain development as unconscious processes that are heavily colored by emotion (Santrock 2014). Sigmund Freud was a psychoanalytic theorist who established a psychosexual theory believing that development occurred during life stage conflicts between a source of pleasure and the demands of reality. Many theorists after Freud believed that there was a good basis in Freud’s theory but it relied too much on the idea of sexual instincts. One such theorist was Erik EriksonRead MoreFoundations of Human Development in the Social Environment Essay828 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿ Foundations of Human Development in the Social Environment BSHS 325 Foundations of Human Development in the Social Environment The foundation of human development, responds to the breakdown of its commitment to the development of attitudes and skills, which facilitate authentic personal, spiritual, and social development and the transformation throughout an individual’s life span. During an individual’s life span, the foundations of human development begin to change, as the directRead MoreLife Span Perspective Essay1187 Words   |  5 PagesLife Span Perspective Paper Cindy Amundson Psy/375 April 11, 2011 Professor Deborah Wilkerson, M.A., ABD The study of human development is a science. It is based on theories, data, analysis, critical thinking, and sound methodology (Berger). Five characteristics of Development that will be discussed in this paper are multidirectional, multi-contextual, multicultural, multidisciplinary and plasticity. There are also five theories of development which are psychoanalytical, behaviorism,

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Song Comparison Essay - 997 Words

Matthew Chung Chung 1 Ms. Spilberg ENG2D1 March 5, 2013 Song Comparison Essay The road of life can be a bumpy one. There will always be twists and turns that can alter a person’s life, changing the course of their destination. Even though life can be tough, you have to draw upon your inner strength in order to persevere. The songs, â€Å"Move Along† by The All-American Rejects and â€Å"Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)† by Greenday sing about this message. The lyrics in their songs have many literary devices such as personification, repetition, symbolism and juxtaposition. The personification will help you†¦show more content†¦The theme is how when you have a tough, important moment in life, you have to make the best of it and move along. An image for these lyrics will help you connect to the theme because you can see what is going on and a picture will help you understand something more. In my next paragraph, I will be talking about how the singers used repetition to emphasize certain points. In these songs , lyrics were repeated. Repetition draws the listener’s attention to particular words or phrases. In the song, Time of Your Life, the singer repeats the line, â€Å"It’s something unpredictable, but in the end it’s right. I hope you had the time of your life.† This line is repeated throughout the song multiple times. The singer is emphasizing the fact that anything can happen when you make your choice but in the end, you have to just relax and be happy. He wants the audience to really understand it. In the other song, the line, â€Å"Move along, move along. Just to make it through† The singer is repeating the term, â€Å"Move along† because that is the main message in this song. It is to move along when things seem bad. The singer wants the audience to really get the message and to feel good when they relate to this song. These lines connect to the theme because they are talking about moving on in tough situations and being satisfied with th e outcome. These lyrics were emphasized well. Besides repetition, the singers also used symbols and juxtaposition toShow MoreRelatedA comparison of the Use of Language between the Chimney Sweeper from Songs of Innocence and Experience1198 Words   |  5 PagesA comparison of the Use of Language between the Chimney Sweeper from Songs of Innocence and Experience Even though, a hundred and seventy nine years later, lying in his grave, William Blake is still one of the best influences in poetry and even daily life today. Blake’s work, unrecognised during his lifetime, but now is almost universally considered that of a genius. 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Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 - 1883 Words

The police have a range of powers to stop and search people. The most widely used of these is under Section (s) 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (PACE) which allows the police to stop people or vehicles in public places and search them for stolen goods and other articles. However, in line with most stop and search powers, this only applies where the constable has ‘reasonable suspicion’ that these articles will be found. Prior to PACE, there existed a patchwork quilt of police powers to stop and search people and vehicles. There were some powers which could be used by constables of any police force in the country, for example, the power to stop people and search them under s23(2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (MDA). A number of police forces had local powers to stop people and vehicles and search them for stolen goods, such as that under s66 of the Metropolitan Police Act 1839 (MPA). Significantly, there were no standard conditions for the exercise of the powers (Fieldman 2002:307). In total, there were some 16 statutes that gave police powers to stop and search but in other situations the police lacked the requisite powers they needed. The police claimed that this situation frequently left them open to risk of civil action for stopping and searching where no power existed and also criticism for failing to act (Zander 1990:3). In addition to the above fragmentary powers, police in England and Wales routinely carried out stop search powers under what wasShow MoreRelated The Police Powers of Search, Arrest, and Interrogation Essay2031 Words   |  9 PagesThe Powers of Police Individuals have civil rights; people are entitled to be allowed to move freely and to have their person and their property respected. However the police must have sufficient powers to investigate crimes. 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The Effect Gamma Rays free essay sample

Who is a quitter, camper and climber? Beatrice is a quitter. ?A Quitter refers to people who choose to opt out, cop out, back out, and drop out. Quitters abandon the climb. They refuse the opportunity the mountain presents. They ignore, mask, or desert their core human drive to ascend and with it much of what life offers. ?Similarly, instead of working hard, Beatrice chooses to opt out, and give up on her life. Evidences: 1. P: gave up her dream of being a dancer E: â€Å"did you know what I’d be now if it wasn’t for this mud pool I was sucked into? I’d probably be a dance. Ms Betty Frank, The Best Dance of Class 19†¦Ã¢â‚¬  I: instead of working hard and trying to step out of this mud pool, she gave up. 2. P: Beatrice claims that she had made a mistake but she does not attempt to make it up to herself and strive for a better future. We will write a custom essay sample on The Effect Gamma Rays or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page E: â€Å"One mistake. That’s how it starts. Marry the wrong man and before you know it he’s got you tied down with two stones around you neck for the rest of your life. † (32) 3. P: Beatrice gave up dancing without even trying hard enough to get back those dancing legs. E: â€Å"Before I knew what happened I lost my dancing legs and got varicose legs. Beautiful varicose legs. Do you know, everything I ever thought I’d be has exploded! † (33) Ruth is a camper. ?Climbers are people that only go so far. Weary of the climb, they terminate their ascent and find a smooth, comfortable plateau on which to hide from adversity. And there, they choose to sit out their remaining years. ?Campers, unlike quitters, have at least taken on the challenge of the ascent. They have gained some ground. ?Similarly, Ruth stops self-improving or trying hard to succeed and chooses to stay put. Evidences: 1. P: when ruth sees that the house is in a mess, she did not bother to do anything about it.